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There are a vast selection of books that can deepen our knowledge of our economic system and our understanding of how to practically change the system to support human and ecological wellbeing. 

This past week, we reached out to our member network to suggest their top picks for these kinds of books. Here’s the result of this participatory process, listed alphabetically.

The  2021 Wellbeing Economy Reading List:

  1. Prosocial– Paul W.B. Atkins, David Sloan Wilson and Steven C. Hayes

2. Rethinking Racial Capitalism- Gargi Bhattacharyya

3. Humankind – Rutger Bregman

4. The New Possible – Philip Clayton

5. Sacred Economics – Charles Eisenstein

6. Green Swans – John Elkington

7. Debt: The First 5000 Years- David Graeber

8. Less is more – Jason Hickel 

9. Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer 

10. The Value of Everything- Mariana Mazzucato

11. The Nordic Theory of Everything- Anu Partanen

12. How to Reshape Market Society and Redefine Democracy – Raj Patel 

13. The Tyranny of Merit- Michael Sanden

14. The Lorax – Dr. Seuss

15. Growing Young: How friendship, optimism and kindness can help  you live to 100 – Marta Zaraska

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In case you missed them, here is a list of our Wellbeing Economics book recommendations from 2019 – 2020 This list  compiles recommendations from our members  WEAll members” and the WEAll Read book club.

  1. An Economy of Wellbeing: Mark Anielski
  2. 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism: Ha-Joon Chang
  3. Change Everything: Christian Felber
  4. Wellbeing Economy: Lorenzo Fioramonti
  5. The Divide: Jason Hickel
  6. New Economy Business: Margo Hoek
  7. Local Is Our Future: Helena Norberg-Hodge
  8. The Age of Thrivability: Michelle Holliday
  9. Prosperity Without Growth: Tim Jackson
  10. The High Price of Materialism: Tim Kasser
  11. A Finer Future: Hunter Lovins, Stewart Wallis, John Fullerton and Anders Wijkman
  12. Economics Unmasked: Manfred Max-Neef
  13. The Spirit Level: Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson
  14. Doughnut Economics: Kate Raworth
  15. What Money Can’t Buy: Michael J. Sandel
  16. Small is Beautiful: E.F. Schumacher
  17. Local Dollars Local Sense – Michael Shuman
  18. How to Thrive in the Next Economy: John Thackara
  19. The Economics of Arrival: Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams

During the pandemic, many people are finding themselves with more time on their hands – and many are also in pursuit of new economic ideas and understanding.

WEAll and our members have compiled some recommendations for ‘must-read’ books  to understand the case for, and path towards, a wellbeing economy.

Here’s the result – 20 important books that provide answers, inspiration and hope.

Of course, this list is not exhaustive – comment below with your own recommendations. Why not get involved with the WEAll Read book group, which is holding monthly meetings? Find out more here.

Alphabetically by author:

  1. An Economy of Wellbeing: Mark Anielski
  2. 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism: Ha-Joon Chang
  3. Change Everything: Christian Felber
  4. Wellbeing Economy: Lorenzo Fioramonti
  5. The Divide: Jason Hickel
  6. New Economy Business: Margo Hoek
  7. The Age of Thrivability: Michelle Holliday
  8. Prosperity Without Growth: Tim Jackson
  9. The High Price of Materialism: Tim Kasser
  10. A Finer Future: Hunter Lovins, Stewart Wallis, John Fullerton and Anders Wijkman
  11. Economics Unmasked: Manfred Max-Neef
  12. Local Is Our Future: Helena Norberg-Hodge
  13. The Value of Nothing: Raj Patel
  14. The Spirit Level: Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson
  15. Doughnut Economics: Kate Raworth
  16. What Money Can’t Buy: Michael J. Sandel
  17. Small is Beautiful: E.F. Schumacher
  18. Local Dollars Local Sense: Michael Shuman
  19. How to Thrive in the Next Economy: John Thackara
  20. The Economics of Arrival: Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams

 

 

WEAll members submitted their recommendations for ‘must-read’ books  to understand the case for, and path towards, a wellbeing economy.

Here’s the result – 15 important books that provide answers, inspiration and hope.

Of course, this list is not exhaustive – comment below with your own recommendations.

 

Alphabetically by author:

  1. An Economy of Wellbeing: Mark Anielski
  2. Change Everything: Christian Felber
  3. Wellbeing Economy: Lorenzo Fioramonti
  4. The Divide: Jason Hickel
  5. New Economy Business: Margo Hoek
  6. The Age of Thrivability: Michelle Holliday
  7. Prosperity Without Growth: Tim Jackson
  8. The High Price of Materialism: Tim Kasser
  9. A Finer Future: Hunter Lovins, Stewart Wallis, John Fullerton and Anders Wijkman
  10. Economics Unmasked: Manfred Max-Neef
  11. The Spirit Level: Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson
  12. Doughnut Economics: Kate Raworth
  13. Small is Beautiful: E.F. Schumacher
  14. Local Dollars Local Sense – Michael Shuman
  15. How to Thrive in the Next Economy: John Thackara

A Finer Future: Creating an economy in service to life

By L. Hunter Lovins, Stewart Wallis, Anders Wijkman, John Fullerton

A Finer Future is aimed at business leaders, entrepreneurs, activists, and anyone who cares about the future of our planet. Rich with stories of communities implementing solutions, it describes the exciting news in the work to transform finance, business, energy agriculture and many other areas of our society to create an economy that works for every one of us.

Find out more about the book and order your copy here.

WEAll’s Katherine Trebeck has written a chapter for a new ebook by Open Democracy, available free here. Edited by Laurie Macfarlane, “New Thinking for the British Economy” brings together leading thinkers to outline the broad pillars of a new economic agenda, and the type of policies that are needed to get us there. As well as more traditional policy areas such as trade, finance, housing and industrial policy, the book explores a range of areas that are not typically considered to be within the sphere of economic policy but which nonetheless play a critical role shaping our political economy – such as the media, our care systems, racial inequalities and our constitutional arrangements.

Katherine’s chapter – “Building a Wellbeing Economy” – explains that GDP is a wholly inadequate measure of progress for the twenty-first century: the narrow pursuit of growth-at-all-costs is failing to meet human needs and destroying the planet. Repurposing the economy away from GDP towards outcomes that align economic success with the delivery of human and ecological wellbeing is therefore an essential step towards an economy that works for people and planet.

Download the ebook for free now.