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Reposted from Mint Magazine

Ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, Mariana Mazzucato was crowned the winner of the new Not the Nobel Prize by public vote in London last night.

Mazzucato, Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London, was recognised ‘for reimagining the role of the state and value in economics’.

The award ceremony was hosted by comedian Mark Dolan in central London and attended by fellow finalists Steve Keen, Kate Raworth and Tom Rippin.

Economists Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, Laura Carvalho, and Randall Wray were also up for the innovative award celebrating the thinkers and doers who are finding economic solutions to the challenges of the 21st century.

Receiving the award for Mazzucato, Henry Li shared her remarks paying tribute to her fellow finalists: “Dark times need enlightened thinking. I’m honoured to receive the prize alongside some luminary economists asking critical questions. To name a few, Steve [Keen] encourages us to ask about the structure of our financial system, Kate [Raworth] encourages us to get real about both the analysis and implementation of a circular economy, Laura [Carvalho] helps us to rethink macro-economics questioning the assumptions behind austerity.”

Mariana Mazzucato is the Founding Director of the UCL Institute for Innovation & Public Purpose (IIPP) and author of ‘The Entrepreneurial State’ and ‘The Value of Everything’. Her research has revealed that every piece of technology that makes the iPhone ‘smart’ was government funded: the Internet, GPS, its touch-screen display and the voice-activated Siri. She argues that the public sector’s role can and should extend well beyond fixing market failures to co-creating markets, especially in responding to climate change and the Green New Deal.

Henry Leveson-Gower, creator of #NotTheNobel Prize and CEO Promoting Economic Pluralism said: “Over the past half-century, the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics has celebrated ideas at the heart of an economic system heading for collapse. We urgently need fresh economic thinking to meet the challenges of ecological breakdown, financial crises, and soaring inequality”.

A message from WEAll Youth:

“We are thrilled to announce that Wellbeing Economy Alliance Youth (WEAll Youth) has been selected as one of the 50 Youth Solutions featured in the Youth Solutions Report 2019. 4300+ solutions originating from 170+ countries were submitted and based on a rigorous review process, 50 were selected to be featured in this year’s report. We are so excited to be selected among many inspiring youth solutions. Young innovators all over the world are working towards a sustainable future – we’re proud to be part of the change!

You can read all about us at www.youthsolutions.report (WEAll Youth can be found on p85).

We are so proud we have been selected and can’t wait to see what the future will hold. All of the solutions selected are so promising which is amazing to see as our world often portrays all the negative sides. We are excited to see so many young people getting involved @ their future.”

More about the report:

NEW YORK, USA; September 26: The third edition of the ​Youth Solutions Report,​ which identifies ​50 youth-led projects that are accelerating global progress on the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)​, has been released today, at the ​74th UNGA High-Level Side Event on Social Business, Youth and Technology.

This year, the selected solutions have been chosen by an advisory panel of 24 leading experts across all SDG sectors and geographical regions, among a pool of applicants that included over 4,300 submissions from ​174 countries​. Winning projects were particularly focused on introducing innovative approaches to lifting vulnerable communities in developing countries out of poverty, with solutions targeting areas such as digital health and education, financial inclusion, innovation in agricultural practices, sustainable livelihoods, and circular economy.

Like its 2017 and 2018 predecessors, this year’s Youth Solutions Report provides ​selected initiatives with a powerful platform to secure funding, build capacity, communicate experiences, and scale efforts. In addition, the new edition includes an in-depth analysis of the role of youth-led innovation in achieving the specific SDGs that have been reviewed at the July session of the 2019 High-Level Political Forum, focusing on the role of young people in improving access to quality education, promoting decent work for all, reducing inequality, combating climate change, promoting peaceful societies, and supporting a renewed global partnership for sustainable development.

One key aspect of the Report consists of its discussion of cross-cutting challenges to youth-led innovation and the importance of seeing young people as a fundamental component of the broader innovation systems that are required to implement the 2030 Agenda. ​

Mariana Mazzucato, Director of the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose at University College London​, said: ‘The SDGs are the world’s challenges, and can only be achieved through directed, mission-oriented, innovation activities, taken on through bold new partnerships between the public sector, business and civil society. The Youth Solutions Report provides a loud, dynamic forum for youth to be heard and learned from in this critical solutions-oriented process.’ Ms Mazzucato’s auspices were echoed by ​Paul Polman, former CEO of Unilever and recent founder of Imagine,​ who recognized that ‘creating the right policy frameworks for engaging young people in SDG implementation will a big enabler of the entire Agenda’. According to Mr Polman, ‘the Youth Solutions Report serves as a platform that will increase exposure to youth-led projects that will hopefully push policy reform in the future.’

Siamak Sam Loni, Global Coordinator of SDSN Youth​, added that while young people are already contributing to the implementation of the SDGs, they still face common challenges that prevent them from realizing the full potential, including the lack of visibility, limited access to finance, and the lack of training and technical support. ‘The 2019 Youth Solutions Report will help investors, donors, and supporters better understand the multi-faceted role of young people in sustainable development and give them additional opportunities to showcase and scale their work’ concluded Mr. Loni.

As further testimony of SDSN Youth’s commitment to concretely supporting its growing global cohort of young innovators, this year’s report was prepared in collaboration with Junior Chamber International (JCI), which ensured that ​5 of the selected solutions could be provided with grants from the Global Youth Empowerment Fund. ​The Fund, founded by JCI in partnership with the UN SDG Action Campaign, offers grants and training to youth-led projects that advance theSDGs.​EarlSawyer,Interim Secretary-GeneralofJCI​,said:‘JCIisproudtocollaboratewith SDSN Youth on their 2019 Youth Solutions Report. We are excited to offer young people the recognition, tools, training and resources needed to scale their SDG-focused projects in order to tackle global problems’.

By Henry Leveson-Gower, Founder and CEO of Promoting Economic Pluralism

Thank you to everyone who took the time to get involved in the first round of nominating and voting for the #NotTheNobel Prize. We have been really pleased with how many people have taken the time in nominating, commenting and voting. We hope you have found the process so far fun and interesting.

I was really pleased to see some nominees that I had never come across before, which is great. I hope to follow up with them and feature them in The Mint, our magazine, in future issues.

We have now selected seven finalists. You can see their details and related information here. We decided to choose seven finalists to have a diverse field and there was a clear gap in voting numbers between the top seven and next most voted for.

I hope you find it interesting learning more about them. We have tried to summarise their achievements from the nomination and comments, and add links to further information and related articles in The Mint. You can also go back to look at the original nomination and comments.

In the 1st round, it was possible to vote for as many nominees as you liked. We have taken a different approach in the final round. You can vote for your top 3 and order them into 1st, 2nd and 3rd. Your 1st choice will get 3 points, your 2nd 2 points and so on. We hope this approach will ensure the winner is supported by a wide range of those who vote, while not requiring people to range all seven.

You can now start voting and even change your mind later! The button to go to the page to vote is on the same page here. We are using google forms as having looked at a lot of options this seemed the most straightforward while also ensuring people only vote once! You do though need a google email to login and you can find out how to get one here. You can also change your mind and edit the form up until voting closes at the end of our final event on 3rd October 7-8pm UK time. More details to come on that very soon…

Ultimately though clearly the point of this prize is not to select a winner but to create a broader discussion about different ways of understanding and organising our economies. Please do provide comments on the finalists at the bottom of their pages and join the debate on twitter and facebook, #NotTheNobel.

Thanks very much again for taking the time to give your view on the solutions we need to survive and thrive in the 21st century. I think we definitely need some positive visions in what can seem like an every more frightening and challenging world.

Vote now

Our economic system is driving us towards a perfect storm. We are facing ecological breakdown. Rising debt is threatening a new financial crash. Inequality is pulling societies apart.

WEAll member Promoting Economic Pluralism (PEP) is challenging the scientific prestige of the Nobel Prize, which for 50 years has given authority to economic ideas at the heart of this system. And even though the stark consequences of the 2008 financial crisis are still felt today, these out-dated ideas remain dominant.

We urgently need to reroute society away from this catastrophic path. That starts with fresh economic thinking.

Who are the thinkers and doers finding the economic solutions we need to meet the challenges of the 21st century? Help PEP find them and celebrate them.

And join the discussion about whether economics, as it stands today, is worthy of a Nobel Prize.

Find our more about the Nobel Prize in Economics and its influence in PEP’s blog here.

HOW?

You can now get go to the new online platform here where you can nominate, discuss and vote on who you think are providing the thinking and action we need for the 21st century.

Read articles on Nobel Economics Prize winners here in PEP’s magazine, The Mint. Join the discussion on social media #NotTheNobel.

Voting for the three finalists for the Not the Nobel Prize will open on 23rd September.

WHEN? WHERE?

The winner of the Not the Nobel Prize 2019 will be announced at an event in London on Thursday 3rd October between 7pm and 8pm (GMT/UT). This will follow a panel discussion of the finalists. It will be live-streamed around the world.

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel – often called the Nobel Prize in Economics – will be announced on Monday 14th October.