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New WEAll Members, European Health Futures Forum (EHFF) and Feasta, have teamed up to deliver the Bridging the Gaps podcast series, which covers topics like:

• How best to measure wellbeing
• The politics of land
• Wealth distribution
• Diversity, both biological and cultural
• Blame, shame and compassion
• The role of digital technology in society

…..all in the context of a biosphere which is critically ill and in need of urgent care.

They recently put out a podcast episode: ‘Towards Wellbeing’, featuring David Somekh of EHFF interviewing Stewart Wallis, Chair of WEAll

The episode covers a wide range of topics, including:

  • Reasons why a large majority of people consider the current economic system to be dysfunctional
  • Five basic things that people throughout the world say they need
  • Potential for Ireland to join the WEGo Partnership (which currently consists of Scotland, New Zealand, Wales and Iceland).

Watch the podcast episode (#6) and the rest of the EHFF & Feasta’s Bridging the Gaps podcast series, here.

With a lot of information (and misinformation) available about COVID-19, WEAll wants to share two thoughtful and useful contributions that help to frame the ongoing situation from a systems thinking perspective.

In this TEDx talk, global health expert Alanna Shaikh talks about the current status of the 2019 nCov coronavirus outbreak and what this can teach us about the epidemics yet to come. Alanna Shaikh is a global health consultant and executive coach who specializes in individual, organizational and systemic resilience. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University and a master’s degree in public health from Boston University. She has lived in seven countries and it the author of What’s Killing Us: A Practical Guide to Understanding Our Biggest Global Health Problems.

On Medium , micro biologist and systems thinker Phoebe Tickell has compiled a summary of articles and facts to act as a briefing document for , people who run organisations, events, conferences, communities, or have any sway over the decision-making at these places.

She writes:

“All of the practice you may have done around systems thinking, community care, holding complexity, is coming to bear right now. This virus is forcing us to see in systems.”

Read her article: ‘I need you to read this and decide about Coronavirus‘.

Also on Medium, a summary of articles and advice by Tomas Pueyo has also been gaining a lot of attention. It does not explicitly take a systems change lens to the crisis, but it does contain very useful and verifiable information that may help you with urgent decision making.

Read his article: ‘Coronavirus: why you must act now‘.

From NHS Health Scotland website

NHS Health Scotland welcomes the First Minister’s move to prioritise a wellbeing approach to Scotland’s economy.

The economy plays an important role in our health and wellbeing because we know that poverty and income inequalities are major causes of health inequalities. Redesigning the economy with equality of outcomes for all, to ensure everyone is able to participate fully in society, is fundamental to improving health and wellbeing and reducing inequalities.

NHS Health Scotland therefore supports the new Public Health Priorities, including the development of a sustainable and inclusive economy which puts the health and welfare of people and communities first. This work will continue in Scotland’s new lead agency for improving and protecting health and wellbeing, Public Health Scotland, from the 1st of April.

Gerry McCartney, Head of the Scottish Public Health Observatory, NHS Health Scotland said:

“Public health isn’t often the first thing you thing you think of when talking about the economy. But, public health in Scotland is changing and we must do things differently across all the factors that have an influence on our health.

“Living in poverty is hard and damaging to our health. Having sufficient money is one of the many things that matters to health, along with being socially connected, feeling safe and secure, living comfortably and access to sustainable services. All of these are at the centre of a wellbeing economy and are part of the inclusive right to health.

“Moving towards a wellbeing economy where health, wellbeing and people-led outcomes are the drivers for all policies is a needed shift for everyone to have a fair chance to thrive. It’s a welcome change that puts the wellbeing of people in Scotland first and GDP second. When people are well and thriving, so will the economy. ”

Sarah Deas, Trustee, Wellbeing Economy Alliance (Scotland) said:

“A wellbeing economy is one that delivers for people and planet. Our current economic system is not doing this – it is creating physical and mental health issues. We have designed the economy this way, so we can redesign it with a different purpose; that of collective wellbeing.  We welcome NHS Health Scotland’s support for systems change such that the economy delivers good lives for people first-time around, rather than requiring so much effort to patch things up.”