Posts

WEAll is pleased to announce the launch of the first official US-based WEAll Hub: WEAll California. 

On November 12th, the Institute for Ecological Civilization (EcoCiv) and WEAll will gather online with a broad group of organizational leaders and policy makers, to officially launch the hub. 

This virtual event will bring together participants from across the state, including representatives from the Santa Monica-based Civil Wellbeing Partners, sustainability experts from Los Angeles city government, Bay Area non-profit directors and religious leaders, community foundation representatives from Humboldt County in Northern California, individuals working in the Sierra Nevada region and central valley, and a number of city economic development leaders. 

The goal of this broad representation is to encourage a holistic approach to envisioning and planning for improved wellbeing in California.

The bulk of the event will be facilitated conversations about what ‘wellbeing’ means in California, identifying key policy initiatives needed at the state and local level, and discussing next steps. Our goal is to leave with a set of clear priorities to galvanize efforts in California, going into 2021. 

Discussions will be divided into three parts: 1) visioning, 2) backcasting, and 3) road mapping. Using online collaboration tools, participants will share major components of their vision for wellbeing in California. 

What does wellbeing mean? What does it include? How do we want the California economy to look, ideally? How can an emerging new economy look beyond growth alone to focus on the wellbeing of people and the planet?

If we look backward from this shared vision, what first steps already exist or should exist? 

The backcasting section will include short reports from representative organizations on work they are already engaged in around the state, including ideas for how such work could be scaled and where roadblocks are present.

After the reports, we will break into smaller groups to continue identifying policy changes that could be helpful for the short and long-term as well as areas that deserve a longer-term focus.

In the last section, we will begin to build a roadmap toward an economy focused on wellbeing in California from the existing work and priority areas already identified. And finally, we will end by talking about concrete next steps for the California hub as we approach 2021.


If you’re interested in getting involved, please reach out to the WEAll California hub team through EcoCiv here and learn more on the WEAll California Page here.

The use of the term, ‘Wellbeing Economy’ has been increasing with Scotland being an official member and organiser of the Wellbeing Economy Governments partnership, WEGo.

On Thursday 27th August, 75+ economic development practitioners gathered at a Consultation hosted by the Economic Development Association Scotland (EDAS) and WEAll, to exchange ideas about how Scotland can further develop wellbeing economy policies and discuss the practical implementation of a Wellbeing Economy in Scotland.

Dr Robert Pollock, Managing Director, Regional Development Solutions and EDAS Board Member and Amanda Janoo, WEAll’s Knowledge and Policy Lead, introduced WEAll’s Policy Design Guidebook. The Guidebook aims to support policymakers looking to introduce wellbeing economy policies in their respective spheres, with a focus on the ‘how to’: presenting specific policymaking principles and processes to turn ideas into actions.

WEAll Scotland’s Gemma Bone Dodds, set the stage for the discussion of actualising a wellbeing economy in Scotland, by presenting the wellbeing economy policies that already exist in Scotland and where there are potential gaps. Breakout groups then explored possible next steps to move Scotland beyond a Wellbeing Economy framework and vision, and toward policy implementation.

Gary Gillespie, Chief Economic Adviser from the Scottish Government, closed by discussing the WEGo partnership and Scotland’s development of their national performance framework.

Get Involved

The input from the Consultation supports a participatory process that is vital to the Guidebook‘s creation. If you are a policy maker interested in reviewing or supporting with the guides development please contact Amanda Janoo, WEAll’s Knowledge and Policy Lead.

Submit a ‘Wellbeing Economy Case Study

As the Wellbeing Economy space is new, policies supporting the health of people and planet are often not recognised as “wellbeing economy policies”. In order to inspire policy makers on their journey to creating wellbeing economy policies, WEAll is looking for case studies from around the world — especially from the Global South –that are examples of wellbeing economy processes (e.g. participatory policy processes) and outcomes (e.g. bold wellbeing policies). Please share relevant case studies here by August 31st, 2020.

By Alexander Evatt, Helsinki, Finland

Dear WEALL community,

Two weeks ago, WEAll Youth brought together WEAll Youth, Citizens and Members at ‘WEAll Connects’, our first Intergenerational event aimed at creating a space to build cross-generational connections and discuss WEAll Youth’s initiatives and goals.

I had the great pleasure to facilitate the first WEAll Connects session, which welcomed WEAll Youth and WEAll members from all over the globe, including Argentina, Canada, USA, Uganda, Kenya, Netherlands, Scotland, UK, Spain, Singapore and many others – weaving a tapestry of intergenerational connectivity and support.

My journey as a member with WEAll started last year, during my Master studies on ‘Leadership and Change Management’ in Amsterdam. Part of my thesis research centered on how to create the bridges between generations in organizations and get intergenerational energy flowing. One of the main findings of my research was the importance of creating “safe spaces” that allow people to share and get to know each other by opening up and listening to different perspectives.

This is one of the reasons I was excited about the co-creation, within the WEALL community, of a space to explore how we can collaborate across generations to build connections, hear one another’s voices and offer support.

Part of the intention for the WEAll Connects event was empowerment. There is power in connecting Youth, the leaders of the future, with experienced experts within WEAll’s network, who can offer confidence and insights.

Together, we explored how to best find synergies and collaboration possibilities across generations and communities, discussing:

  1. What are your greatest challenges?
  2. What do you want to achieve by the end of 2020?
  3. In what ways can we continuously connect, share ideas and projects and support one another?

We explored challenges, such as navigating difficulty in creating engagement, a lack of awareness around intergenerational work, translation of ideas into action, as well as how to integrate Youth voices into the work of WEAll members.

We also felt positive emotions, such as excitement, openness, joy, appreciation and compassion for one and other – and a sense that this is something we want to be a part of.

We all shared the urgency for a unified space where WEAll Youth and Members can share networks, projects and invitations for collaboration and meet regularly.

I felt as if all of us who joined the session embodied what such a WEAll connecting space looks like, feels like, talks like, and works like!

I’m looking forward to continuing the WEAll Connects sessions by building on inspiration and ideas from our first event, deepening our connections and creating value for one and other.

Join us – I’m looking forward to connecting at the next WEAll Connects event!


Alexander Evatt
Next Generation Leadership Coach
alexander@newdirection.fi 
www.newdirection.fi

#WEAllConnects #BridgingGenerations

Do you remember wanting to create change in the world, but not knowing how to achieve this through your career?

Promoting Economic Pluralism wants to give young people 25 and under a say in how we use the recover to Build Back Better.
That’s why they are holding the virtual Festival for Change, which offers expert career guidance for youth on how to help shape a better future through their career – for free! WEAll Youth is proud to be a festival partner.
From July 27th, people from around the world can enter a competition and enjoy a series of online events to change the economic outlook of the world, post pandemic.
1. Develop a proposal to shape new economic landscapes in a Challenge.
2. Join an Explore Workshop to discuss how to widen your thinking
3. Watch Provocation Sessions led by world-renowned speakers on new ideas and approaches to global issues.

Register here.

Do you instinctively support the principles of Wellbeing Economics, but don’t know how you can express that in your everyday life?

Over the next four months, the Grant Rule Trust is launching a  Build Back Better webinar series, which will discuss how we rebuild ourselves and our communities after the massive impact of COVID-19 on our health and wellbeing, our social cohesion and our economy.

The first two webinars are:

23rd July, 7.30 pm BST: How Is Your New Normal Looking?

Sue Rule will look at the political and economic landscape of the UK as we start to come out of lockdown, and some of the challenges and opportunities we face in the changing world, over the coming months.

27th August, 7.30 pm BST: How To Keep Going
Improving our resilience to stress and looking after our individual wellbeing.

Visit http://grantrule.org/events/ to sign up and to view past webinars, papers and slides.

The Repair Stop, a new community repair enterprise, is opening in Glasgow on 21 July. Sophie Unwin, founder and director of the Remade Network, shares her thoughts on how community repair enterprises such as The Repair Stop can provide a model on building a greener, fairer world.

As the Remade Network launches its new, collaborative community repair project in Glasgow, Katherine Trebeck’s words resonate with me:

“The economic model that has become so dominant is called all sorts of things: neoliberal, market fundamentalist, overly financialised, extractive, and toxic. What it is called doesn’t matter so much as how it has strangled our imaginations and our sense of possibility.”

We know the scale of the challenge that we face in our world is huge. Oppression, inequality, waste, and pollution are in every corner. Headed in one direction, it looks like an inevitable move to a certain dystopia – where we blindly consume and compete instead of sharing resources and showing empathy to each other.

As bad as things could get, it perhaps allows us to dream big of a better world that we would like to see. But for those of us – like me – who have reached our middle age, our hopes are inevitably tempered with a sense of realism. We have heard new ideas and slogans come and go, from sustainable development to the triple bottom line. And we know that real change can be hard won, as it speaks of shifts to the status quo.

Could a wellbeing economy offer us something new?

“As bad as things could get, it perhaps allows us to dream big of a better world that we would like to see.”

For me, building an economy based on repair skills – the work I’ve carried out over the last 12 years, which has grown from London to Edinburgh and now Glasgow – chimes closely with what the Wellbeing Economy Alliance advocates. This is a regenerative economy, one that prevents waste at its source rather than just recycling materials; a collaborative economy where we work with other community groups and Glasgow City Council; and a business model with purpose and shared values at its heart.

In January this year, we started work in earnest with five other organisations: Govanhill Baths Community Trust, Repair Café Glasgow, Glasgow Tool Library, The Pram Project, and Glasgow City Council. Meeting each fortnight, we developed a collaborative business plan, for which the City Council granted us a social enterprise start-up grant.

Then came COVID-19.

With no social contact allowed, we started meeting online and had to pivot our plans. But we also had space to share ideas, discuss our values, and reflect on what was really important to us. From April, Remade Network has grown from three members of staff to seven, and this July we open our new project – The Repair Stop.

Based at Govanhill Baths’ Deep End on Nithsdale Street in Govanhill, The Repair Stop will offer affordable repairs, priced at £5 or £10, and accept donations of unwanted laptops, phones, tablets, and prams that we will fix, redistribute, and sell on.

And, thanks to contracts with both Glasgow City Council and the Scottish Government, we will be distributing 500 desktop computers to vulnerable people across the city. People like Mohamed from the Somali Association, who will ensure the computers help people find jobs, access basic services, and stay in touch with their families. And people like Elaine, a single mum whose son, Maxwell, has struggled to do his schoolwork since COVID, as they don’t have a working computer at home.

The C-40 Cities Climate Leadership Group have recently published some principles about a green recovery, and some of these speak to the project:

  • Excellent public services, public investment, and increased community resilience will form the most effective basis for the recovery
  • The recovery must address issues of equity that have been laid bare by the impact of the crisis
  • The recovery must improve the resilience of our cities and communities

Equity and resilience are so vital here. It is the people who consume the least who are most impacted by pollution and environmental problems. But it is also those people, and poorer communities, who often hold a wealth of creativity and ideas. Poorer communities are already used to being resourceful and resilient.

As the Aboriginal leader Lilla Watson says, “If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time, but if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

Moving away from extractive to regenerative economies also means valuing indigenous knowledge, the skills and ideas that are already in place when we come to start work on a new project. Without this basic attitude of respect and curiosity, how can we achieve anything meaningful?

We firmly believe that repair can help us build a better world post-COVID and help regenerate forgotten places. It values and draws on people’s skills and creativity, as each repair is different, and it creates new jobs – repairing creates 10 times as many jobs as recycling. Finally, it brings people together and helps build community. Repair is not a new idea, but it is one whose time has come.

As the Wellbeing Economy Alliance reminds us, “Humanity defines economics, not the other way around.” In many ways, this could be a motto for social enterprise as a whole – business and profit is not the end in itself, but a means to harness our core values and create a better world.

You can visit the Repair Stop at 21 Nithsdale Street in Glasgow, open 12-2pm Monday to Saturday, from 21 July, for repairs of household items and to donate unwanted and broken laptops, phones, tablets and prams. For more information, email repair@remade.network, visit www.remade.network, or follow @remadenetwork on Twitter and Facebook.

(Photography credit: Hollin Jones)

By Isabel Nuesse

This past month, I represented WEAll at an online ActionAble event on the topic of ‘Homelessness in the UK’. The webinar included two other speakers, Lisa-Marie Bowles from LB Camden and Shane Cole from Feed Up Warm Up,

Lisa-Marie spoke about current actions taking place in Camden on housing during the time of COVID. Shane reflected on his own experience with homelessness, his continued healing and inspiration for Feed Up Warm Up.

During the event, I spoke to homelessness from a wellbeing economy perspective. From this lens, homelessness should not be viewed as an individual’s personal failing, but rather as a failing of our economic system. In a wellbeing economy, human and ecological wellbeing are prioritised, and can be resolved together. For example, a wellbeing economy envisions community-owned, eco-friendly housing as a potential solution to ensure that everyone has access to safe and affordable housing, without causing harm to our environment.

Following the presentations, over 30 participants from across the UK broke into working groups to discuss concrete ways that governments, businesses, NGOs and communities could end homelessness and ensure quality housing for all. This following list of tangible policies to tackle homelessness was generated under 10 minutes.

Our main takeaway?

We already have the solutions.
Now we need to make those solutions ActionAble.

 

Government Intervention

  • Government to purchase buildings in cities that can provide social housing.
  • Put pressure on the government to disclose where the money that is supposed to support individuals experiencing homelessness, is actually being diverted to the appropriate causes.
  • Provide government and non-profit services as a package offered under a single banner, as opposed to disjointed efforts from government and non-profits. This would allow interventions to ensure there are no gaps in service.
  • Ease regulations that require individuals to have an address to access basic services.
  • Simply give people homes.
  • Require new buildings to have a certain space for social housing / reduced rent.
  • Government to commission housing specifically for those who are housing insecure.
  • Give tax relief to organisations that are willing to help secure housing for individuals in their communities.
  • Require those that have a second home to give up their space for those without housing.
  • Tax by total land owned instead of by the location or square footage of the home.
  • Signpost empty houses and allow people to sleep there.

 

Business/NGO Intervention

  • Keep emergency beds in hotels and hostels to support those who are housing insecure.
  • Target organisations and companies to share their spaces with those that are experiencing homelessness.
  • Incite collaboration amongst non-profits to holistically support those that are experiencing homelessness, as opposed to working in silos.
  • Build ‘Airbnb for the Homeless’ i.e. empty bedrooms could be shown online, and homeless individuals could ‘book a room’ for the night.

 

Community-Based Approach

  • Partner elderly folks experiencing unstable housing and loneliness, together.
  • Create a nation-wide campaign to destigmatise homelessness.
  • Build shelters in every town and community.
  • Provide specialist support for those experiencing homelessness, to ensure they are well cared for and safe.
  • Scrap the law (in the UK) that prohibits people from receiving services from outside their boroughs.

 

If you have any suggestions to add to this list, please comment on the blog below to start a conversation.

 

We’d like to continue to develop this thinking as part of our work with government bodies who are working on building back better to a wellbeing economy.

 

Our member SOGH and Global Health Film are hosting a series of ‘Global Health Film Classics’ movie screenings every Sunday from July 5th to 26th! The series covers important and topical public health issues, including emerging pandemics.

This Sunday, July 5 at 7pm BST, they will screen The Islands and the Whales, which talks about ocean pollution and the impact on people’s health. After the screening, you’ll have the chance to speak to both the director and protagonist.

Here is the trailer for the series and the details for the next three films in the series.

Sunday 12 July, 7pm – My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War (brain injury)
Sunday 19 July, 7pm – Unseen Enemy (emerging pandemics)
Sunday 26 July, 7pm – I Am Breathing (ALS)

Do check them out!

On June 30 2020, WEall hosted its first meme generating workshop. In small groups, the participants used an online meme generating platform, iloveimg to create humorous images about our current economic system.

These memes are intended to capture a key piece of narrative development that is vital to disseminating messages around a new economy. WEAll’s theory of change is shown in the image below. It couples narrative and knowledge to create a powerbase that then grows the new economic system.

 

 

 

Memes have the ability to tell stories in small digestible bites that can be easily understood by a diverse audience. Online, they are used widely to bring humor to current events.

In the same way that meme’s tell stories or poke fun at current events, these memes can be used to highlight the inadequacies of our current economic systems.

WEAll prioritises this kind of storytelling, as it helps to simplify the complex nature of our work.

We are exploring hosting another y ‘meme generating’ workshop to generate a ‘Wellbeing Economy meme bank’ to share with our member network. Stay tuned!

Below are a few examples of our favorite memes that came out of the workshop today:

This week, WEAll joined Social Enterprise Scotland in a webinar: ‘Time for Change – New Economy’ on the role businesses can play in creating a Wellbeing Economy.

Three great speakers joined the session: Michael Roy (Glasgow Caledonian University), Michael Weatherhead( Wellbeing Economy Alliance) and Julie McLachlan (North Ayrshire Council).

If you missed it, you can watch the webinar recording here.

WEAll’s Michael Weatherhead covered takeaways from our Business of Wellbeing Guide, from the 19 minute to the 39 minute mark, including:

  • Analysis of the dimensions businesses need to deal with when trying to contribute to building a wellbeing economy, from leadership to accounting for impact;
  • Case studies of pioneering businesses to inspire what’s possible;
  • Expert views on how to navigate transformation;
  • A self-assessment tool to help decision makers plan their next steps.

Download the PDF guide here – or explore extracts in our dedicated Business of Wellbeing web portal.

On Wednesday 24 June, WEAll hosted an online event with Ayomide (Ayo) Fatunde: ‘Systemic Racism, Black Lives Matter and the Wellbeing Economy’.

WEAll organised this event to create a space for dialogue about systemic racism and how it relates to our work to transform economies.

If we’re serious about transforming our economic systems so that they deliver for everyone, then we also have to be serious about equity and justice. Racial injustice is an economic problem – it’s baked into our current economic model. Those of us working for change have a responsibility to be proactively anti-racist as we do so.

WEAll as an organisation is still learning in this space, and we know many of our members are too. We’ve always understood the need to tackle systemic racism but we haven’t always given it the focus it deserves.

That’s why we were so excited to have the opportunity to learn from Ayo, a Nigerian-American blogger and activist who is currently working in the automotive industry in Germany. Check out her own blog at toxicallyfeminine.com and the brilliant piece On Violence she recently wrote for WEAll.

Ayo kicked off the event by asking participants to vote on which aspect of systemic racism we found most uncomfortable – “White Supremacy in societal structures” got the most votes, so that’s where she started. Sharing a very helpful set of definitions (download PDF here), Ayo spoke about the historical context for white supremacy, particularly in the USA. She emphasised the importance of distinguishing between personal and systemic racism/white supremacy.

“We can’t just focus on individuals in discussions on race and police – we need to talk about systems, and the policies and structures within them”

Participants from around the world asked questions, leading to an illuminating discussion about neo-colonialism and the economic structures and decisions which perpetuate inequality. Ayo also shared her own personal experiences of systemic racism in the different places she has lived (Nigeria, Miami, Kenya and Germany).

In terms of advice for white people who are seeking to be good Allies in the Black Lives Matter movement, she said:

“A good ally knows when to put their feelings aside – and listen, as opposed to speaking.

We need to work work on this at 3 levels: have a tough conversation with yourself, have a tough conversation with friends and family, and have tough conversations with the political system.

Keep having it. That’s the important part.”

This is just the beginning of a fundamental conversation about systemic racism and how the wellbeing economy movement can proactively confront it in our efforts to transform the economic system.

Discussion and action will continue via the WEAll Citizens platform.

Watch the full event below or on YouTube here. And here’s the link once again to download Ayo’s fantastic list of anti-racist definitions and resources.

By Lisa Hough-Stewart

 

 

17 June , 2020

WEAll Knowledge and Policy lead Amanda Janoo was a panellist at a session of the UN World Academy of Art and Science on “Emerging New Civilisation(s)” this week.

She was one of six female speakers, with one from each continent:

  • Amanda Janoo, Knowledge & Policy Lead, Wellbeing Economy Alliance, USA
  • Audrey Lobo-Pulo, Founding Director, Phoensight; Founding Board Member, Open Data Australia
  • Azadeh Farajpour, Research Associate, FAW/n (Research Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing), Iran / Germany
  • Mamphela Ramphele, Co-President of the Club of Rome; Co-founder Reimagine South Africa
  • Rebecca Hueting, Activist, Extinction Rebellion; dissemination specialist, Deep Blue, Italy
  • Samantha Suppiah, Sustainability strategist, Urban Doughnut, Philippines

It was a rich and fascinating discussion, exploring cultural and economic experiences from around the world. The focus was how sustainable wellbeing can be delivered for all.

Watch the event below or on the UN WASS Facebook page here.

Emerging New Civilization(s)

Emerging New Civilization(s)

Posted by World Academy of Art and Science on Wednesday, June 17, 2020

WEAll’s Executive Chair Stewart Wallis OBE took part in a spirited and hugely popular online dialogue last week, organised by EcoCiv, on “The Next Economy“.

Stewart was joined on the impressive panel by: Kate Raworth (Doughnut Economics and WEAll Ambassador), Marjorie Kelly (The Democracy Collaborative), David Korten (Living Economies Forum)  and Gunna Jung (Economic Advisor to Seoul Metropolitan Government)

They discussed the following questions:

“As the socio-economic effects of coronavirus worsen, the deep failures of our global economic order are being revealed. Is this the end of the neoliberal era? What will the economy look like after COVID-19? Can our next economy promote the overall well-being of people and the planet?”

Watch the event below or find it on YouTube here.

Are you a young person who wants to play a leading role in solving the problems of the 21st century?

This summer, The Useful & Kind foundation is hosting a summer school for individuals between the ages of 16-30 in York, UK from 6-10 July to give you the skills you need to lead.

Useful & Kind originates from President Obama’s suggestion that we all be ‘useful and kind’ to one another. It is a basis and value set to stand upon in any kind of position. The Useful & Kind foundation is keen to teach how to be a Useful & Kind leader in order to solve problems in your local community. The goal is to build a large constituency of those wanting to make a better life for us all.

Over the weeklong training, the leaders will work on awareness building, idea creating, research conducting and strengthening debate skills. The aim is to create a better, fairer and more sustainable future, starting with understanding how to be a leader in community.

Duncan Fraser, Director of U&K Unlimited, will lead the summer school. He invites guest speakers, to share their experiences with the group. Additionally, the larger group of 24 individuals is broken into smaller groups who are led by junior mentors, all whom are experienced in the field and with the U&K approach.

This opportunity is a great way to learn how to develop leadership skills of the future. With many problems to solve, we need all the leaders we can get. If you’re interested, sign up using this link:

https://www.usefulandkindunlimited.com/projects-1-2

 

By Isabel Nuesse and Robert Wanalo

What are we going to do when weather patterns change and communities that depended on their consistency, suddenly have to re-imagine how they’ll receive their incomes? Planning for resilience in the face of climate change will soon become mandatory for communities. Makerspaces offer a solution that enables the community to develop resources and knowledge distinct to their communities changing climate. Thinking of these long-term strategies to are key to ensuring the sustainability of makerspace development. Two of the five principles for developing makerspaces actualize this thinking:“Include Environmental Ecosystem Services” and “Build for Continuity”.

  1. Include Ecosystem Services: Aim to give back more than you take from the environment and include accounting practices that value the natural resources used.

Our natural environment is the broader ecosystem within which our social and economic system is nested. An economy that has proved through the outcomes it creates, to be working against rather than with nature, and climate change is one of the many forces that threaten our very existence today.  The Fridays for Future and Extinction Rebellion movements are continuing to gain traction globally, as citizens realize that systems change is fundamental for climate action. As citizens become more aware of the complex ecological challenges we face today, how can we be empowered to take practical actions towards climate justice? Our group discussed this extensively. There was a general consensus that the makerspace movement should increasingly leverage their innovative capacity to support climate action in communities across the world. 

A great movement that has formed around this objective is the FabCity Global Initiative that was co-founded by Tomas Diez of Fablab Barcelona. The audacious goal behind the FabCity Challenge is to enable this shift away from the industrial paradigm of Product-in Trash-out, by enabling the return of manufacturing to cities such that by 2054, the cities that sign up for the Pledge, with be able to produce everything they consume, thus drastically reducing their carbon footprint. The potential of GIG as a global movement of techies and innovators to be able to contribute to addressing climate change was the impetus behind the Sustainable Making Track. 

One case study from within the GIG network that demonstrates Principle 3 is the work of Sri Lanka based DreamSpace Academy through their Underwater Glider project which aims to enable local communities to better understand their surrounding Indian Ocean ecosystem. 

After the Tsunami hit back in 2004, the oceans ecosystem was significantly disrupted, and the local community started seeing changes that were not normal. One such observation was a large number of eels that had emerged from the backwaters, which locals presumed to be snakes, as such species were not commonly visible above water. Aravinth Panch, and his team at DreamSpace took this as an opportunity to carry out research that aims to increase local awareness on their surrounding habitat. 

For this, they needed to have an underwater glider which, if purchased from Europe would cost over 200,000 Euros which was of course too expensive. As a Community Innovation Center and local makerspace the team decided to use open source technology to build their own Underwater Glider, which will enable  them to carry out their own scientific research and assessment on their local ecosystem through which they would be able to increase their awareness and strengthen their capacity to develop solutions for some of the issues that have risen since the Tsunami. 

It’s impossible to place a value on nature, in many ways it provides for our essential everyday needs. But recognizing that the services we receive are not free, and that we have a responsibility to ethically deal with our planet, because a thriving ecosystem means that our social and economic systems would equally be able to flourish.

2. Build for Continuity: Design for the present and future; build social capacity, & aim for financial self sufficiency. 

In the age of the internet, where social networking and access to knowledge has been significantly augmented, the makerspace movement is developing a compelling case for ‘glocality’, that is a globally connected community that is locally proactive towards achieving common objectives. Inevitably it must have been this worldview that necessitated the existence of SDG 17 “Partnerships for the Goals,” whereby, even in development, we must depart from centralized systems towards those that are more decentralized and geographically distributed to ensure that agency is created at a local level.

Critical to the ability of any initiative, project or enterprise to be in operation for the long term, is its ability to to build social capacity to be able to carry out the necessary tasks for the project, and the economic models that ensure its costs can always be met. Particularly with regards to the latter aspect of financial sustainability, there was a shared aspiration in our track for makerspaces, like social enterprises, to be able to generate enough revenue to cover their operations.

With this Global-to-local approach,  Sustainable Making has the potential to transform the social, economic and ecological fabric of communities across the world. Developing local capacity and encouraging local innovation creates opportunities for new business models that create jobs and build more resilient local economies. Thinking in this way does not fight against the inevitably globalized world, but rather redesigns it to be more inclusive and equitable.

The Access to Skills and Knowledge Technology Emergency Case (ASKotec) is an open source tool co-created by the R0g Agency and Open Source Ecology Germany e.V. The tool provides over 1000 pieces needed to facilitate training in rural areas on the fundamentals of open tech and open source hardware innovation, education and repairing. The transformational technology establishes a base by which the community can expand upon the training to innovate locally.

At the Rhino Refugee camp in Uganda for example, where Platform Africa, one of the 6 hubs in the ASKLab East African network, is using the ASKotec kit to hold Open Tech workshops and training for displaced refugees living within the camp. Richard, an ASKotec trainer, says that these sessions enable the participants to be engaged in something interesting and productive, considering their current reality. An outcome of these sessions is that refugees in the camp learned how to repair chargers, phones and radios and in the case of the ATAKA hub in Juba, participants have been able to establish microenterprises with these skills. To learn more, watch this YouTube video here

Alongside the r0g Agency, Field Ready is another organization doing great work in the humanitarian space. They are an NGO that operates a network of makerspaces that empower and support local innovators in complex humanitarian situations triggered either by conflict or natural disasters to make the things that are needed where they are. They are a team of experts that leverage their expertise digital manufacturing with CNC, laser-cutting, & 3D printing to support local production of  products like lifting airbags for rescue workers, hydroponic systems for food production, as well as components for the repair of solar systems and healthcare equipment. Field Ready has established makerspaces in Iraq, Northern Syria, Jordan, Fiji, and Nepal, to name a few. By up-skilling locals, designing and implementing solutions with them, Field Ready ensures that local production continues in these communities long after the crises they face have subsided.

 

At the DOTS conference in December 2019, we joined a working group whose aim was to find out how makerspaces are could amplify the level of impact they are already creating in the communities in which they exist across the world. We articulated these findings in 5 Principles of Sustainability, which are as follows:

 

  • Make things that make sense:  Create products and solutions that solve fundamental, real-world problems.  
  • Integrate Local Knowledge:  Design with the community, leveraging on local knowledge and experience, as well as the local resources & assets available.
  • Include Ecosystem Services: Aim to give back more than you take from the environment and include accounting practices that value the natural resources used.
  • Build for Continuity: Design for the present and future; build social capacity, & aim for financial self sufficiency.
  • Share How You Make: Develop a set of guidelines that provide a framework for openly documenting everything about the making of the project. 

 

 

These principles provide a framework for makerspaces around the globe to consider in their development, operations, and  strategy. Not only do these spaces provide opportunity for communities to revitalize their local economies, but it inherently builds an economy that enables communities to be self-reliant. 

Over the next few weeks, WEAll will be publishing a blog series that showcase different case studies from groups that are a part of the Global Innovation Gathering (GIG), and The r0g Agency for Open Culture and Critical Transformation.

WEAll Scotland’s Wealth of Nations 2.0 event, held in Edinburgh last week, didn’t just energise the packed out room – it generated buzz across Scotland and beyond about wellbeing economy ideas.

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon delivered a groundbreaking speech where she declared that Scotland must “redefine what success means as a nation”, and endorsed the approach of the Wellbeing Economy Alliance. Along with Iceland and New Zealand, Scotland is leading the pioneering Wellbeing Economy Governments initiative. You can read the full text of her speech here.

Sturgeon’s words, and the messages of the conference, generated extensive media interest. Here’s a roundup of the coverage so far:

Have we missed some coverage? Share links in the comments below!

Photo by brotiN biswaS from Pexels

 

WEAll Scotland hosts its second large scale event – Wealth of Nations 2.0 – in Edinburgh today.

The conference will be addressed by Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and attended by experts and practitioners working to transform the economic system from across Scotland.

Ahead of her speech, Nicola Sturgeon has issued a clear statement that “wellbeing is as important as economic growth” and that Scotland must “redefine what success means”. Read about her commitment to building a wellbeing economy in this BBC coverage.

WEAll’s Katherine Trebeck has written in today’s Herald newspaper about the significance of the conference and the urgent need for governments and all of us to take action in order to transform the economic system. She says that “Scotland also has a role to play on the world stage, demonstrating that humanity can determine economics instead of the other way around.”

In The Times, Head of Oxfam Scotland Jamie Livingstone writes about the injustice of unpaid care, and why valuing caregivers should be a litmus test of whether we are succeeding in building a wellbeing economy. Oxfam Scotland is one of the key partners and sponsors of the Wealth of Nations 2.0 event. Earlier this week they launched important new research into the value of unpaid care in Scotland.

Keep up with the Wealth of Nations 2.0 event as it happens by following @WEAllScotland on Twitter. This page will be updated with further media coverage as it emerges.

 

By Isabel Nuesse

On October 10th, WEAll Scotland held an event in Edinburgh in collaboration with Baillie Gifford and the Global Ethical Finance Initiative.

“The transition to a sustainable economic system: what’s the role of finance?” raised questions of the future of finance and how the sector can adapt to the challenges of the 21st century. The speakers were Frank Dixon of Global Systems Change, Jessica Runicles of Business in the Community and Andrew Cave of Ballie Gifford, hosted by WEAll’s Lisa Hough-Stewart.

Frank Dixon presented his concept of System Change Investing (click to download PDF) as a proposal for an approach the finance sector could take, modelled on his extensive experience developing SRI frameworks. He questioned, what if the finance sector applied the rule of law (“do no harm to others”) to their thinking? How would that effect the systems that make up the sector as well as the investments that are made inside it? He argued that investing in systems change is the most important action needed to solve climate change and address the Sustainable Development Goals.

The conversation then evolved into speaking about the role of business in environmental and social governance. Jessica Runicles emphasised how important it is for financiers to educate businesses on their opportunities to become more responsible. While explaining the Responsible Business Map she talked of some challenges she has with businesses not grasping the profitable opportunities better business can present.

Our final speaker was  Andrew Cave from Baillie Gifford who had the audience watch this video, “Corporate Scandals that Changed the Course of Capitalism.” He spoke about Baillie Gifford’s long term investment and engagement strategies and their new communications approach which emphasises the need for investors to “help shape the new world – not just shore up the old one”.

After the speakers presented, we had a panel discussion where the audience was able to ask questions. It was clear that education is a huge missing piece in elevating the role of finance in society. It was discussed that radical transparency is also necessary to increase the understanding of how the finance sector works and more specifically, how individuals and business can take more aggressive steps to move money into more socially responsible initiatives. The event provided a valuable opportunity for finance professionals and other interested attendees to share their challenges in creating change openly and honestly, and it was the start of a valuable conversation that WEAll will continue to drive forward.

Follow @WEAll_Scotland to find out about other upcoming events in Scotland. If you’re interested in getting involved with WEAll’s work on finance within Scotland contact us here.

 

Lisa Hough-Stewart of the WEAll Amp team and WEAll Scotland team recently attended a community engagement event with Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England, organised by Glasgow Council for the Voluntary Sector (GCVS).

This was a great opportunity for the Governor to hear how economic policies and realities are being felt by the most vulnerable people and communities in Glasgow, and for attendees to learn more about the purpose and work of the Bank of England. Lisa was pleasantly surprised to hear from Carney that the objective of the Bank is to “promote the good of the people” as well as his recognition that we are in times of serious change. It is encouraging that he is undertaking this series of community and citizen engagement events, which demonstrates a real willingness to understand the lived experiences of British people.

Lisa took part in a spirited table discussion with fellow charity/non-profit representatives, which covered basic income, lack of dignity in the welfare system, the lack of hope in our current system for people living in poverty, and the trend towards insecure work that fails to offer meaning and purpose.

Outgoing Chief Executive of GCVS Helen Macneil made powerful closing remarks touching on the need for economic system change:

“The UK has become stuck in trying to meet the needs of its people because we are using 19th  and 20th century thinking, systems, concepts in responding to 21st century issues. We’re not facing up to  21st century conditions – changing demography and its impact on people and communities; lack of social mobility; changes in the labour market; increasing social isolation; the impact of social media; and the wider digital revolution …and climate change.

We’re never going to address these effectively if we stay as we are – in silos and comfort zones. Our decision making is slow when it needs to be fast; our systems are clunky when they need to be flexible; our public institutions are risk averse and uncertain when they need to be solutions focused, confident and assured.”

Watch the summary video of the event below, including a clip of Lisa talking about WEAll, and read more here.

Last week, an enthusiastic crowd in London attended the sold-out event to promote ‘The Economics of Arrival: Ideas for a grown-up economy’ by Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams.

Hosted by WEAll members CUSP (the Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity) and GEC (Green Economy Coalition), the event attracted academics, civil society professionals, activists, journalists and more, all keen to understand more about the need for economic system change and to engage in the debate about how we get there.

Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams inspired the audience with an overview of the book’s themes and concepts. Williams explained that the concept of ‘Arrival’ is “not a promise but the possibility of having enough.” The authors argue that for many countries, there are now diminishing returns to  growth and that they ought now to focus on ‘making themselves at home’ by prioritising human and environmental wellbeing.

Trebeck made the case that our global economic system is manifestly failing to deliver – on poverty, wellbeing, health, environment, and equality. “People feel their lives are out of control. The system isn’t working,” she said.

Sharing examples such as Japan and Costa Rica to demonstrate the potential of alternative economic approaches, and ending with a positive message that economic system change is possible, the speakers certainly got the room talking with this introduction to their work.

Questions and ideas came thick and fast from those in the room who were keen to delve further into the concept of Arrival.

A panel discussion featuring Professor Tim Jackson of CUSP and Irene Gujit of Oxfam GB, as well as Trebeck and Williams, gave an opportunity for more exploration, as the room considered the different applications of the book’s concepts in the global south as well as tangible ways to build a wellbeing economy in the UK.

‘The Economics of Arrival: Ideas for a grown up economy’ is available from Policy Press here.

Watch a short video summarising the ideas in the book:

Images: Ben Martin