Short Bio:

Natalia Marsellés is a 23-year old Master’s student in Sustainable Business and Innovation in Barcelona, Spain, and a member of the social media team of WEAll Youth. 

Have you ever thought about where your clothes come from? Who made them? What is the real cost of your wardrobe, not only economically speaking but its social and environmental impact?

Fashion Revolution Week is a time when we come together as a global community to think about the fashion industry practices and raise awareness to demand a better fashion industry.

In 2013 we saw one of the worst industrial disasters in history following the collapse of the Rana Plaza Building in Bangladesh. Sadly, more than 1100 people died and another 2500 were injured. This is when Fashion Revolution was born, quickly becoming the largest fashion activism movement in the world. Fashion Revolution envisions a global fashion industry that conserves and restores the environment and values people over growth and profit.

During the Fashion Revolution Week, a clear and decisive message is launched, with hashtags that have now become a symbol of revindication and the confrontation against fast fashion: #WhoMadeMyClothes #WhoMadeYourClothes

This year’s Fashion Revolution Week theme “Rights, Relationships, and Revolution” promotes the connection between human rights and the natural world. The campaign aims to amplify unheard voices within the fashion industry while exploring innovative solutions to promote sustainability. 

——————

To delve into the meaning of Fashion Revolution week and learn more about sustainable fashion, I sat down with Dr. Federica Massa Saluzzo. Dr Saluzzo holds a Ph.D. in Strategic Management from IESE Business School, a post-doc from the University of Bologna, and teaches strategic management at EADA Business School. 

Her research interests include social value creation, sustainable fashion, and social innovation, and shared with WEALL Youth her thoughts on the fashion industry. 

1. What does fashion mean to you?

For me, it is a way to express your authentic identity, your culture, and your values. Just like your language or the design of your home, for me, fashion is a language that speaks up for you and who you are. 

2. What are your views on fast fashion?

Ah! I am not fast in general! see the benefits of enabling a large number of people to access “some” kind of fashion, but since for me fashion is a means to communicate your culture and authenticity, nothing fast can convey culture and authenticity effectively. Fast fashion may provide the illusion of being fashionable but it does not truly sell fashion. What is sold through fast fashion is something else:  it does not sell authenticity, because a lot of the trends are copied from smaller brands,  it does not sell quality, because anyone who does not pay a decent salary to any of the actors of the supply chain cannot speak of high quality, and it does not sell uniqueness, because no matter how quick you are, there are thousands of copies of the same garments. 

3. What does sustainability mean for you?

If I avoid citing all the literature defining sustainability and only speak my mind, sustainability means caring. Caring for the people whose work makes my life so easy, and caring for the planet that offers us everything a human being needs.

4. Is fast fashion sustainable? Can it be sustainable?

Well, no! 

5. What is the future of fast fashion? In spite of the growing demand for eco-friendly clothing, most consumers don’t want to pay more for it. So, what’s the solution?

I work in education, so I believe that education is the way. Through the Asociacion Moda Sostenible Barcelona, a great effort in educating the Spanish market is in place.  They have organized the MODS (Moda + Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS)), short and cheap podcasts for whoever feels they can make a change through sustainable fashion, they also have a sustainability dictionary initiative in their social networks, where they explain the real meaning of some of the key buzzwords in sustainable fashion, and they constantly strive to sum efforts to make sustainable fashion relevant. 

6. What can we, as consumers, do to change this trend?

Reuse, recycle, reduce, restyle.  When you are about to buy something ask “where does it come from? Where will it go?” And then decide, maybe you can look for something more sustainable, maybe you don’t need to buy, maybe you can learn to stitch or maybe you can just add a unique detail to something you already own…and make it truly yours. 

————

This week, WEAll Youth joins the Fashion Revolution movement by sharing our members’ thoughts on fast fashion and the transition towards a more ethical and sustainable garment industry for all of us. 

What do you think about fast fashion? Share your ideas with us and join the revolution! 

#WhoMadeMyClothes #WhoMadeYourClothes

#theworldyouwant #fashionrevolution #slowfashion #weall #weallyouth #wellbeingeconomy #peopleandplanet #peoplebeforeprofit #planetbeforeprofit #neweconomy #circulareconomy #youth #changemakers #makeachange #ethical #sustainable #fair

By Mkyeku Onesmo Kisanga, WEAll Youth

“Wellbeing Economy” directly translates to ‘uchumi wa ustawi’ in Swahili which is an official language in Tanzania. Tanzania is found in the Eastern part of Africa with approximately 61.5 million people with over 120 unofficial languages (tribes inclusive). Being one of the largest countries in Africa, seeking to achieve a wellbeing economy can be difficult.

Most of the citizens fall on the poverty line of the GDP of Tanzania which means approximately two thirds of the whole population this has only worsened with the current Covid19 situation. The current life expectancy in Tanzania is around 60 years which means there is a deterioration.

Why is it important?

Wellbeing economy approaches could solve the recurring precarious problems in our communities. With this, we could improve our life expectancy rate, improve our healthcare especially in remote areas, improve digital literacy and remove the huge gender gap (statistics show men have a higher literacy rate than women in Tanzania), and provide reliable employability for the youth and people of Tanzania.

Enabling people to benefit from their hard work and engagement and even during retirement, they are well taken care of. No huge gaps in their salaries reduce and bridging of the difference in salary from the rich to middle class to destitute ones. This provides collective cooperation and cohabitation.

Repairing and make reparations for the current economic situation which is crumbling down. This will shift us to a circular economy.

We envision a future where everyone is well taken care of and don’t have to endure the challenges we are facing lately.

A wellbeing economy for Tanzania would provide a coherent and yet efficient transformation of the economy in Tanzania keeping in mind that the current situation didn’t favour some classes and professions and affected everyone entirely. 

Central to the transformation required would be improving the education systems that are deteriorating and exclusive of gender, tribe and people of a certain class. Our education systems should cater for the needs of everyone collectively without being biased.

Focusing on wellbeing would help prevent all the barbarous acts of crime happening because youth are idle and lack the motivation they need and resort to committing crime to sustain their needs. Regulating the cognitive dissonance in the area prevents people from embracing opportunities and new ways of life.

Residents inclusive of aboriginals, citizens, migrants and the whole diaspora need to apply the holistic approach and multifaceted approach to a wellbeing economy. Including everyone equally will provide longevity of results that are pleasant and positive leading to freedom and less conflict.

How to achieve a wellbeing economy:

Achieving a wellbeing economy simply means treating human beings as the first top priority rather than financial and monetary needs, resulting in a sustainable realm. How does one provide inclusivity while integrating all the tribes and cities in Tanzania and promoting a sustainable economy?

  • Use of Swahili, which is not only prominent in Tanzania but the whole of East Africa . After all, Swahili is already termed as one of the leading and most frequently spoken languages in the world. This will definitely boost the country’s economy by promoting union with neighbouring and other states in Africa and globally.
  • Addressing gender equality and gender gap- making sure women and men contribute equally to the economy and their salaries and reimbursement are the same throughout. Forming policies that accommodate both genders in all professions will reduce harmful social norms and stereotypes and prejudices.
  • Health care- same health care for everyone regardless of their status.
  • Education in learning institutes- use of Swahili language and introduction of this module in every level.
  • Employability, providing enough and accessible jobs that don’t have too many requirements, quota age, experience but provides inclusion of all regardless of their qualifications and experiences. In Tanzania, farmers are the one’s who highly contribute to the country’s economy and yet are disregarded and berated because of the stereotypes in the country. Most value partisans and professions that require one working in a huge company, presented in a formal appearance. While in reality, all are contributors to the economy, thus we need to ensure equal involvement and accessibility regardless of their title and identification.
  • Having youth yarn their creativity side and use their skills to come up with innovative and new ideas in rectifying the economy and also providing them funds and support in every trajectory. This will eventually cater for all tribes and cities establishing a wellbeing economy that doesn’t favour a certain gender, class, tribe or ethnicity.

About the author

Mkyeku Onesmo Kisanga is a 26 year old Tanzanian based in Cyprus pursuing her psychology degree. She is currently looking at how to employ the wellbeing economy in her organisation, Sakonsa in Tanzania which recently started in January 2020. Sakonsa is working with SDG’s 4, 10 & 17 on a voluntary basis through youth willing to make an impact and transforming a better tomorrow. Mkyeku joined in because of her inquisitive and pragmatic nature, she wanted to explore all possibilities and what is out there that is significant and impactful. Connect with her on Linkedin here.

Learn more about WEAll Youth here.

Twitter:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/munro-fraser-6077b11a1/

Organisation:

Contributions:

Commons Paper (not yet published)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Olga_Coretcaia

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/olga-coretcaia/

Organisation:

Contributions:

> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXUpaNPEWKo&t=206s
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/doing-business-differently-eight-mindsets-for-wellbeing-businesses

Twitter: https://twitter.com/nature_batslast?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-sutton-815a7813/

Organisation: University of Denver

Contributions:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/robertwanalo?lang=en

Linkedin:

Organisation:

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/how-can-maker-spaces-boost-sustainability-and-help-build-a-wellbeing-economy
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/how-can-makerspaces-help-build-climate-change-resilience

Twitter: @ro_rohitrao

Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/rohit-rao-031027

Organisation:

Contributions:

Water Paper (not yet published)

Twitter:

Linkedin:

Organisation: Swedish Organization for Global Health

Contributions:

>Health & Environment (not published yet)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rutger_hoekstra?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rutgerhoekstra/

Organisation:

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/measuring-the-wellbeing-how-to-move-beyond-gdp
>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psW3jmQwqiE&t=1s
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw2Iv-LG0k4&t=1979s

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sambutl3r?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sambutl3r/

Organisation: Economists for Future

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/economists-for-future-blog-by-sam-butler-sloss
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/in-the-fight-for-economic-system-change-young-people-are-most-at-risk-and-have-most-to-gain-sam-butler-sloss

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SandraWaddock?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandra-waddock-9384037/

Organisation: Boston College

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/life-centered-wellbeing-economics-for-the-21st-century
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/memes-stories-narratives-and-transformation-to-a-wellbeing-economy

Twitter: https://twitter.com/deassarah?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deassarah/

Organisation: WEAll Scotland

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/employee-ownership-and-co-operatives-in-scotland-a-ten-year-transformation-by-sarah-deas
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/scotland-the-recovery-conference-highlights-recap
>. https://wellbeingeconomy.org/bbc-airs-in-depth-radio-feature-on-wellbeing-economics
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/weall-leaders-appointed-to-key-scottish-economic-advisory-panels
>

Twitter: https://twitter.com/robert_costanza?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robert-costanza-97867b10/

Organisation: Australian National University Crawford

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/major-new-book-on-wellbeing-economics-published
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/women-in-power-countries-with-female-leaders-suffer-six-times-fewer-covid-deaths-and-will-recover-sooner-from-recession
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/covid-19-and-the-transition-to-a-sustainable-wellbeing-economy
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/exploring-ecological-economics-positive-futures-and-work
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/what-is-ecological-economics-and-why-do-we-need-it-now-more-than-ever
> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/youre-invited-to-contribute-will-you-accept

Twitter:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomas-mande/

Organisation: Duke University

Contributions:

Commons Paper (not yet published)

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CostanzaMilo

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milo-costanza-568a2a1a0/

Organisation:

Contributions:

> Food Paper (not yet published)
> https://open.spotify.com/episode/5It7nInIGGYPLLuwvLIclc

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jen_carnegieuk?lang=en

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-wallace-70678745/

Organisation: Carnegie UK Trust

Contributions:

https://wellbeingeconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/WEAll-Briefing-Understanding-Wellbeing_July2020.pdf

Twitter: @mmbuchs

Linkedin:

Organisation:

Contributions:

> 10 Principles of BBB

Twitter:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jfackenthal/

Organisation:

Contributions:

> https://wellbeingeconomy.org/wp-content/uploads/WEAll-BRIEFING-Rebuilding-to-a-US-Wellbeing-Economy.pdf
> Policy Design Guide